Roving Romaniacs and Erica James

An Evening with Erica James.

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Sue: With three of us Romaniacs located within an hour or so travelling distance of each other, it’s always lovely to be able to get together in between RNA events. So when Laura mentioned that author, Erica James, was giving a talk at Southampton Library, it was the perfect opportunity to catch up. We met beforehand and had supper at an Italian restaurant before heading over to the library. Erica gave a great talk, she came across as warm and funny, as well as very modest. I have to confess to not having read any of her books but after listening to her talk about several of them, I have The Dandelion Years in my sights.

It was also great that we got to meet up with Laura from Lozza’s Book Corner and Shaz  from Shaz’s Book Blog, both lovely ladies and super book reviewers.

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Catherine :  My first NWS report told me to read Erica James novels to help me learn my craft. I was already a fan and enjoyed doing as they advised. So it was quite special to discover my debut novel was being published on the same day as Erica’s 20th. The chance to meet Erica was great and she had some brilliant advice and insights for everyone at the talk. Here’s to 20 more!

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Laura: It was a fabulous evening, spent with wonderful friends, and I have to thank Laura (Lozza’s Book Corner) for the heads up, as I would not have wanted to miss the opportunity of meeting one of my all-time favourite authors. The first Erica James novel I read was Love and Devotion. It made me cry. It has stayed with me for years. It is a superb example of how to pack an emotional punch and write a beautiful story. Erica was warm, engaging and delightful, and it was an absolute pleasure meeting her. She will continue to be a major influence and inspiration in my writing. I am one very lucky and very happy writer.

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Life Cycle Of A Writer: When It All Happens At Once

The writing life is full of waiting and I’ve discovered in more recent months that when it does happen, it all happens at once! Following a successful book launch for Waiting for You, I then had my deadline to reach for Book Two.

Sending the next book in was more than nerve-wracking. I’m so used to getting other’s opinions and I didn’t get the chance this time so I was thrilled when my editor informed me that it’s wonderful! So I’m delighted to be able to share the title and bio for my second book:

All That Is Left Of Us

One of My Own…

Dawn loves being a mother. No matter how Archie came into her life, or the fact he’s a little different from other children, he is precious and loved. He is hers, after all. Especially because she’s never told anyone who the father of her son is.

So when Dawn’s twin brother David and his wife Rebekah are struggling to have their own child, Dawn agrees to become their surrogate, as it is the one thing she can do to help.

However, creating the perfect family doesn’t always go to plan and when Dawn realises just how much her nephew needs his mother, she begins to wonder if the time has finally come to confront the past she has kept secret for so long.

It has gone up on Amazon for preorder today! So if you want to help me through this round of revisions please click preorder. It’s due out in September.

If that wasn’t enough excitement for the week (bearing in mind it is only Tuesday), I’m now able to share the news that Waiting for You has been shortlisted for the Joan Hessayon Award this year in a stellar list with 14 other friends and authors.

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The results for that will be announced at the RNA Summer Party on May 19th. I had my photos taken by the talented Chris Neaves of Neaves Brothers Photography and although I now have some super serious author shots, don’t be concerned, in real life it’s business as usual:

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With all that having happened over the course of a couple of months, I need a spa day to rejuvenate. It’s a shame my twin girls have other ideas! Why is it all the excitement is always clustered? Maybe it’s because the powers that be know I need a lengthy period to recover.

Catherine x

Guest Post ~ Welcome, Gabrielle Mullarkey

Gabrielle Mullarkey is a novelist, short story writer and journalist, who has worked on women’s magazines for over 20 years. Since gaining her MSc in creative writing for therapeutic purposes in 2014, she works with writing groups for mental health charity Mind, and writes with and for patients at local hospices.

 

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A Tale of Two Sisters, her second novel, takes the reader to the heart of a simmering sibling rivalry that explodes into all-out war!

Having pondered sisterhood while writing the book, she has more question than answers on the bond that can seem like a bind…

Can your sister be your best friend, too?

The art of being a good sister is, to coin a friend’s term, ‘a slippery rabbit’. Anyone who’s tried to cuddle a bunny will know just how mercurial and evasive the fluffy critter is. But even if you do consider yourself close to your sister, is she also your best friend? And if so, is that friendship fostered by shared interests – or is sibling rivalry intensified when sisters follow the same career path or share a passion? Serena and Venus Williams seem to get on OK, despite an intense professional rivalry – but actresses Olivia de Havilland and Joan Fontaine, A-lister sisters from Hollywood’s golden age, reputedly fell out over who won the race for an Oscar (Joan beat big sis Olivia in the Best Actress category at the 1942 awards, Olivia bagging the statuette five years later). Joan is even supposed to have said, ‘I married first, won the Oscar before Olivia did, and if I die first, she’ll undoubtedly be livid because I beat her to it.’

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Blimey, when you get competitive with your sister about who’ll die first, that takes sibling rivalry to a whole new level!

I’m not sure how I’d feel if either of my sisters wanted to be writers. As they’re both teachers, they may be keeping a competitive eye on each other’s league tables, but I’m happy to let them get on with it, never having felt the urge to scale the north face of OFSTED paperwork. And growing up, I didn’t turn to either of them for advice on school, boys, accessories or anything else – I had my best friend for that.

In fact, one of my BFF’s key roles was to let me moan about my sisters, since we all went to the same school – and this is probably why Nikki in a A Tale of Two Sisters gets some of the best lines in the book as the ‘tell-it-like-it-is’ best bud to Katie, disgruntled sister-at-large. Keeping it real, Nikki listens, commiserates and – while she doesn’t hesitate to point out Katie’s contributory culpability for her all-out war with sister Flick – makes helpful suggestions on resolving the schism, such as offering to go halves on a hitman to take out Flick. To Katie, this confirms the blind loyalty you expect (possibly demand) of a best friend precisely because siblings withhold it.

I don’t know about your family, but in my mine, you could only rally followers to your righteous cause (convincing Mum or Dad the other sister did it and ran away) by excelling at the sort of ‘what’s it worth to side with you?’ horse trading that characterises every episode of House of Cards. In fact, if Kevin Spacey ever gets tired of delivering thousand yard stares and gnomic utterances straight to camera, some of my siblings would welcome an audition…

I’m pretty good at that game myself. But what about my own BFF credentials? Well, I may flatter myself, but I was pretty good at that game as well, because my BFF at school had more brother than sister trouble – and I’ve got four of those blighters!

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Find A Tale of Two Sisters at:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tale-Two-Sisters-sisters-boyfriend-ebook/dp/B01CBUPHR2

www.gabriellemullarkey.co.uk

Connect with Gabrielle on Twitter ~ @authorgabrielle

 

Life Cycle of a Writer: When Life gets In the Way

IMG_6365For over two years I’ve struggled with symptoms of ill health which I’d put down to being a woman in her late forties and my rheumatoid arthritis. I’ve experienced headaches that floor me, limbs that can’t support me because they’ve turned to jelly or they’re weighed down with concrete blocks, interrupted sleep, dizziness, nausea, the usual sore and painful joints, and starting each day convinced someone has concertinaed my feet into my shoulders overnight. Every morning I would say to my husband that my pillow was made of rocks.

My focus was shot to pieces and my memory was full of holes. There were times when I struggled to recall people’s names, which I found highly embarrassing as I’ve always been good with people and places. I was fatigued – more so than my usual fatigue that comes with RA – there were days when I couldn’t be bothered to change the channel on the TV because it took too much energy. Thank goodness for my friends and family, who never questioned my actions, or inactions, and who never pushed me to be or do more than that which I felt able.

The symptoms increased – the pain was worse, the headaches lasted longer, the waking up feeling like I’d been in a car crash happened every single day, and I was exhausted. The thing is, I’ve lived with pain for over thirty years. My mind set is that some days are better than others, the bad times will pass, and tomorrow is another day. I’ve always tried to focus on the positive. I never put much emphasis on not being able to run around with the children, choosing instead to enjoy the wonderful times I spent reading to them or listening to them read, watching Barbie or Thomas the Tank Engine videos with them, or simply chatting.

My children are older now, extremely capable and have strong independent streaks. Thank goodness, as this recent bout of poor health knocked me so flat, I couldn’t go out, I couldn’t concentrate for any length of time, and I couldn’t think straight.

And I couldn’t write.

I had book four planned. I knew the characters, the plots and subplots, the issues, the romance, the first twenty thousand words – I had it all, ready to go, but I couldn’t muster the energy to do anything. If I managed to get myself to the computer, headaches would kick in within fifteen minutes and that was me neutralised for the next few hours. I resorted to sitting in a comfy chair in the living room, intending to write longhand, but even that was beyond me, partly down to the lack of focus and headaches, and partly due to my dodgy hands and fingers. I tinkered about a bit on my laptop and it seemed the change of position and the distance of the screen helped for a brief time, but still I wasn’t writing. I was putting together promo pieces for my existing books – creating ads and images to use as pinned tweets. I felt I was doing something positive. Something other than nothing.WDKY Twitter Evie Quote

But I should have been writing.

It became my mantra. I should be writing. I should be writing.

I should be writing.

I’ve always managed to write through the bad times. Always. Why was this so different?

I think I’ve just worked it out; quite literally this minute, as I write this post with hindsight: I didn’t fully understand what had changed and it was hard to see an end to the constant cycle of lack of sleep, fatigue, pain and brain fogginess. At that point there was no promise of a better day, the bad time appeared to have no intention of passing, and tomorrow was another day of much the same. Or worse.

In October 2015, in a regular, scheduled RA appointment, when I explained to my rheumatologist that I lived each day feeling as if I’d walked into a brick wall, that my knees and hips hurt more than normal, that I suspected my jaw was the culprit of the severe headaches, he checked my medical records, gently pressed on a few pressure points around my body, which had me hitting the ceiling, and asked if I experienced other symptoms such as dizziness, lack of sleep and confusion, all to which I said yes. His conclusion surprised me but at the same time, I felt validated.

‘Mrs James,’ he said, ‘it’s fibromyalgia.’

I recall returning home with a sheet of paper which contained addresses of FM websites, in my hand, walking into the living room and my husband asking me if I was all right.

‘Yes’, I replied. ‘But this explains the last few years.’ I handed him the paper, his brow went up, and he nodded.

I hadn’t gone to that appointment seeking answers. I’d gone for my regular RA consultation, but thank goodness for my marvellous doctor and his team. I’ve been again since and between the rheumatology department and my wonderful GP, we are finding a way to move forward with the FM.

The best bit? I’ve managed some serious blocks of sleep and within the last week, I’ve got back the writing bug.

Before finishing, I wanted to thank my publisher for their patience and understanding, and say thank you to all my friends and family for the support, care and space they’ve provided.

I realise this has the potential to be a long and winding road, but today, the sun is shining, my pillow is soft, and I’m excited at the prospect of an empty page.

And tomorrow could be even better.

Take care.

Laura x


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A CROSS-GENRE ROMANCE SET IN ONE OF AFRICA’S MOST VOLATILE HOTSPOTS

Today, we are very pleased to welcome Louise Rose-Innes to talk about her new novel A PASSION SO WILD.

Louise:

As I wrote A Passion So Wild I realised it didn’t strictly fit into the contemporary romance genre, but was more a Louise R-I A Passion So Wild - Louise Rose-Innescombination of suspense, adventure and romance. While there is no doubt the love story between gorilla vet, Lexi Carrington and the wildlife park’s benefactor, Sir Anthony Remy is the central storyline, the pace quickens in the second half of the book when rebels attack the park and Lexi goes on the run with a gorilla carer and an injured boy. With the rebels tracking their every move and Sir Anthony and his SAS buddies not far behind, the stakes are raised and the suspense escalates until the very last chapter.

The unpredictability of the setting provides a perfect environment for heightened tension, both sexual and physical.  The Democratic Republic of the Congo is a politically unstable, volatile country where rebels run riot, corruption is rife and daily life is fraught with danger. The wildlife sanctuary is situated in the tropical rainforest which provides risks of a different kind. The characters have to deal with limited internet connectivity, electricity from generators, no cell phone signal, scorching humidity, tropical thunder showers, and of course all the wild animals and creepy-crawlies one finds in a jungle.

In this book, the jungle seems to have a personality all of its own. I didn’t plan it that way, but when Lexi goes on the run, the lush foliage and dense undergrowth provide shelter and protection as well as limited movement and other hidden dangers. It is at times nurturing, and other times terrifying.

One of the benefits of being an indie author is the freedom to experiment with my novels, themes and genres. With my last traditionally published book, Personal Assistance, I was under the capable but inflexible hand of my assigned editor and my book had to conform to the style and requirements of the publisher’s imprint. While this is perfectly normal, it did limit my creativity somewhat, and at the end of the process the story had changed so much that I hardly recognised it.

With this book, I’ve stuck to my guns and woven the suspense around the romance in a way that I hope my readers will find appealing and exciting. I’ve also brought in aspects that I uncovered in my research which really moved me – such as the endangered mountain gorillas (only 880 left in the world!) and the terrible plight of the villagers who live in the jungle and are at the constant mercy of marauding rebels and government militia.

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The DRC is not all war and chaos, however. There are definite glimmers of hope. The creativity of the people shines through as they learn to cope and even prosper in the war torn environment. Children play in abandon airports, artisans sell homemade produce, rangers risk their lives to protect the wildlife and animal doctors spend hours in the field treating and healing wounded gorillas to ensure their survival.

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All of the research I did created an elaborate and interesting canvas on which to weave my story, but the overriding theme in the novel is one of love, hope and happily ever-afters.

A Passion So Wild is now available at  http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01A4HA4HW/

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Former socialite, Lexi, adores her new, fulfilling life as a gorilla vet in the Congolese jungle. Even the surrounding political volatility can’t dim her contentment – until she meets the sanctuary’s enigmatic benefactor, Sir Anthony. He’s wealthy and arrogant, appearing more concerned with his company’s image than the welfare of the sanctuary he’s endowed. He symbolizes the empty, pampered life she left behind – so why is she falling for him? When rebels attack the sanctuary, Sir Anthony is the only man who can keep her safe – yet he’s also the biggest threat her heart has ever faced.

A fast-paced, romantic suspense novel from Amazon Bestselling Author, Louise Rose-Innes.

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Biography

Louise Rose-Innes writes contemporary romance and romantic suspense. She lives in Surrey, in the United Kingdom and when she isn’t writing, is traipsing through the beautiful countryside or kahaking on the river Thames. Visit her at www.louiseroseinnes.co.uk.